International Psoriasis Council

Advancing Knowledge. Enhancing Care.

Advancing Knowledge. Enhancing Care.

Assessments

A list of commonly used measurement tools for psoriasis management and clinical trials.

GENERAL

DLQI: Dermatology Quality of Life Index

A simple 10-question validated questionnaire that has been used for more than 40 different skin conditions in over 80 countries and is available in over 90 languages to measure disease severity and quality of life.

OPAT™: The Optimal Psoriasis Assessment Tool

A simple proxy for PASI and DLQI using body surface area (BSA) and one or more of Skin Pain Visual Analog Score (Skin Pain VAS), Itch numeric rating scale (Itch NRS), and patient global assessment (patGA). 

PASI: Psoriasis Area and Severity Index

To express the severity of psoriasis by measuring redness, thickness, and scaliness of the lesions, weighed by the area of involvement.

PGA: Physician's Global Assessment

Physician’s assessment of the severity of disease based on a scale from clear to very severe.

PSI: Psoriasis Symptom Inventory

Self-administered, patient-reported outcome measure (PRO) to assess symptom severity in chronic plaque psoriasis.

SPECIAL AREAS & POPULATIONS

CDLQI: The Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index

A 10-question questionnaire based on the experiences of children with skin disease. Available in both a text-only version and the Cartoon CDLQI, with each question illustrated by a cartoon based on the theme of the question, catering to younger children.

PEST: Psoriasis Epidemiology Screening Tool

A validated screening tool for psoriatic arthritis (PsA). It is recommended that patients with psoriasis who do not have a diagnosis of PsA complete an annual PEST questionnaire (NICE psoriasis guidelines 2012). A score of 3 or more indicates referral to rheumatology should be considered.

sPGA-G: Static Physician's Global Assessment of Genitalia

A clinical outcome measure for the assessment of genital psoriasis severity that accounts for the erythematous clinical presentation of genital psoriasis.

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